Category Archives: email

Email In Security Hot Seat

As technology evolves with the rise of the cloud and BYOD, so does the debate on keeping corporate information secure.

Many companies also require remote wiping capability on employee devices in case they are lost or stolen, plus communication encryption software. They also require employees not to use a single password for multiple sites, and some are forbidding passwords of a single word.

But Parris, who formerly held technical and sales management positions at Boeing Computer Services and founded Intercede, argues that securing email also requires identity management — a system that creates a digital identity for employees and other third parties connected to an enterprise, which will then track, “who is sending which email and information to whom, when and protecting it in transit and at rest.”

Even that will not ensure protection of the email, he said. “It must also be run on a secure platform that delivers tightly controlled policy to enforce data labeling, digital message signing, encryption and checking of the actual content.”

Jeff Wilson, principal analyst for security at Infonetics, agrees that an email management platform would help, since “most people are getting email on [multiple] mobile devices that could be lost, stolen, or compromised.”

But he noted a more basic problem for many companies: “They don’t even have an accurate inventory of devices connecting to their network or a framework for building a security policy and buying appropriate security solutions.”

Since email is the primary method of information sharing, enterprises must keep it secure, “to protect intellectual property and to compete in the global business environment,” Parris said.

Source: Email in security hot seat with rise of cloud, BYOD | Consumerization Of It – InfoWorld.

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Best way to spread the message online?

Via Fast Company:

What is the most effective way for marketers to spread their message online? Facebook? Twitter? Company blogs? Email?

According to a new report by marketing firm SocialTwist, Internet sharing trends have shifted heavily shifted toward social networking, but other platforms still have a strong presence for word-of-mouth advertising. SocialTwist analyzed more than a million referral messages sent using the company’s Tell-a-Friend tool, a widget that lets users share sites through social media.

In the last year, social networking sites saw a 10% increase in usage, and a 16% bump in click-throughs. Overall though, email still accounts for 55% of referrals.

Among social networking sites, Facebook is by far the most preferred service for sharing, making up more than 78% of usage.

Yet Twitter has become the most effective tool for click-throughs. Twitter yielded a whopping average of 19.04 clicks, whereas Facebook only produced 2.87 clicks.

This is great news for Twitter, which has hinged its business on Promoted Tweets and Trends, tweet-size ads that companies purchase for $100,000 a day. With such a high click-through rate, it’s no wonder new Twitter CEO Dick Costolo boasted yesterday that the company has “cracked the code on a new form of advertising, and we feel like we’ve got a hit on our hands.”

As Todd points out people today refer via email, share via Facebook and click via Twitter.  Fair assessment or no?

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Securing Gmail

Google Inc.
Image via Wikipedia

The best way may be encryption.

Well, if you want to take a significant step in keeping prying eyes away from your electronic correspondence, one good encryption technology that predates Google altogether is worth looking at. It’s called public key encryption, and I’m sharing some instructions on how to get it working if you want try it.

Unfortunately, better security typically goes hand in hand with increased inconvenience. But some human rights activists who used Gmail right now likely wish they’d put up with a little hardship to help keep hackers at bay. I’m not going so far as to recommend you use e-mail encryption, but I think this is a good time to take a close look at it.

Just be prepared for a major drawback.

Weighed against the encryption advantages of privacy and message signing is the fact that you’ll lose access to service you may like or depend on.

When you see an encrypted e-mail in the Web-based Gmail, it’s gibberish. Google doesn’t index it, so Gmail search doesn’t work. And the strong points of cloud computing–reading your e-mail from your mobile phone, your friend’s computer, a computer kiosk on the airport–isn’t possible. You’re once again anchored to your PC with the encryption software installed. (Source: CNET)

In the end it all depends on the importance of the data.

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Phishing attack targets …

microsoft outlook logo
Image by adria.richards via Flickr

Microsoft Outlook users.

Trend Micro is warning about a phishing attempt that targets users of Microsoft Outlook.

The phishing e-mail arrives in Outlook e-mail in-boxes and looks like it comes from Microsoft. It prompts recipients to reconfigure their Outlook by clicking on a link that leads to a Web site that asks for an account name and password, as well as mail server information, according to the TrendLabs Malware Blog.

By getting the mail server information, the phishers would get total access to the Outlook user’s account and be able to read e-mails and use it to spam others, TrendLabs said. (Source: Microsoft Outlook users targeted in phishing attempt)

In other words use caution and don’t click anything without highlighting the link to see where it goes.

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Backing up WAB

Do you use Outlook Express? Do you know how to back up your address book so that you don’t lose that valuable information if something goes wrong? Here are the five simple steps that will give you piece of mind.

1. Open up Outlook Express.
2. Click on the Tools Menu and select Address Book.
3. Once in the Address Book, go to File Menu and choose Export. Then select Address Book(WAB).
4. You will then be asked to name and choose where you want to backup your address book. Give it any name you want and choose Desktop to backup to.
5. Once named and destination is chosen, click Save. Your address book will now be backed up to the Desktop where you can save it to a disc or jump drive.

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